Saturday, January 20, 2018

Losing....

I'm afraid that, in spite of Prof. Grier's epic "po-mouthing" that he is clearly winning, not losing, the citations race. Consider the two screen shots:


I would say there are two primary ways of judging impact in academic political economy: (1) number of contributions with >= 1,000 cites, and (2) h-index.

Prof. Grier has a 1,000 cite piece; I do not.  And the h-indexes are essentially tied.  AND the "since 2013" h-index is not even close. The difference between 21 and 18 is NOT "3," in any linear sense. He is running away with this, if you take the thing seriously.  I have little prospect of breaking 1,000 with anything any time soon. And he has several papers that were published in very visible places and will likely soon hit the post-2013 h-index.

(If you don't know what an h-index is....)

I guess that I'd go a different way, though. Two knuckleheads who shared an office in a basement 1983-4, who both failed their econ prelims (and deserved to) EACH now have an h-index over 30.  In some larger sense, an h-index over 30 is at least moderately bad-ass. Jim may not have been completely astonished at how Angus turned out, but I know Herb was surprised I ever got a job at all. So, here's to Angus and me, for surprising everyone by not being in jail!

Thursday, January 18, 2018

We'll make Millions!!


Mungowitz doesn't know it, but he and I are locked in a brutal citations battle.

It's brutal because, on a lifetime basis, he's KILLING me (they don't call him Killer Grease Mungowitz for nothing, people).

As of today, he strides the earth like a colossus with 7315 citations while I slink around with 5872.

However, slowly but don't call me Shirley, I'm catching up! in the last 5 years it's 1772 for me and a mere 1766 for KGM. Even better, for 2017 its 314 for me and 284 for him (as of today).

Let's say in a best case scenario, I keep up the 30 cites per year lead. I'm in a 1433 cite hole, so it will take almost 50 years to catch him.

People, I MIGHT NOT LIVE THAT LONG!!


So without further ado, let me present my idea, the amazing Citation Counting Tombstone!

Front of the stone contains an electronic display of your cites, alone or in comparison to any rivals you desire. Inside the stone a device running a python script to scrape the relevant info from Google Scholar (oh and a cell / wifi connection).  Back of the stone is a solar panel to power the various gizmos.

Given my intimate knowledge of the arrogance and insecurity of academics, this will sell like the proverbial hotcakes. Looking for a couple angel investors to finance a first round.

Phone call for @PMARCA!!!!! We can even put the word "blockchain" in the prospectus to drive the crowd into a frenzy.


Monday, January 15, 2018

Monday's Child is Full of Links


1.  Giant spider (it was nearly 5 inches across its legs) causes person to go nuts, try to kill it with a blowtorch. Successfully set spider on fire. But spider then set rest of apartment on fire. Could this happen in the Mungowitz house? Probably not, because the LMM is afraid of blowtorches. But there might very well be ax marks all over the place if a spider were to show up.  Just to close the loop here, the females sometimes carry their young around. This can happen.

2. Really, Huma? You just can't pull the trigger and divorce him?  D2B, I guess.

3. Like a tower defense video game come to life. Three professional soccer players against 100 children.  The children are playing a 30-30-30-10 formation. Um, don't bunch up, kids. Stay spread out.

4.  Florida man! Pardon, is that a full rack of ribs in your pants, or are you just glad to see me?

5. Academic big leagues? Does this advice ring true to you, old folk academics?

6. My parents (dad: upstate NY; mom: rural IN) grew up in places that at that time were not doing well economically. They could have stayed there and hoped that the government would make it possible for them to stay in those places, because...I'm not sure why it would do that, actually. Why not go somewhere else? They did. If you live in place with no economic opportunity, move.   The old Sam Kinison line ("You live in a DESERT! Move to where the food is!") is unfair in Africa, because it's not possible to move. But in the U.S.? Our choices are to help people move, or to provide artificial reasons to stay in places that suck.

7.  It is plausible to call Haiti a sh*thole.  But if it is, it may because the U.S. dug the hole, and then sh*t in it.  Further, it is plausible to call the poor parts of India a sh*thole. But by and large Indian immigrants come to the U.S., create wealth for themselves and value for everyone else.  May their legion increase.

8. If you add constraints--in this case, sappy and soggy leftist views required--you limit responsiveness, adaptability, and achievement of the objective.  Surprising how many people advocate diversity of hues, but not of views.

9. There are plenty of actual eugenicists in the U.S. They were called "Progressives."

10.  I predict that this Florida man will NOT have a life of joy. We all want to be the lottery winner, but it's not really that fun, I bet. That's what I'm telling myself: I would hate to get $282 million in cash when I was 20. That's what I'm telling myself. Hate it, I would.

11. Enacting rituals to improve self-control.

12.  You can't wear a p**syhat to protest Trump's comments, because it might offend people who don't have...well....p**sies? His comment was about women who DO have those things, and there are lots of those people. Not every protest has to be intersectional. WTF?

13. If California is so rich, why is it so poor?

14.  Canada has its limits....

15,  Of crudeness and truth....

16. If it's on Amazon, it must be real. Should ship in March!  



The Grand Lagniappe: I think they are taking this whole "shovel ready project" thing too far.... Or else they just wanted to take the "fork in the road" up a notch.